Amyotroph Lateral Scler Frontotemporal Degener. 2024 Apr 1:1-11. doi: 10.1080/21678421.2024.2336110. Online ahead of print.

ABSTRACT

Background: Environmental exposures impact amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) risk and progression, a fatal and progressive neurodegenerative disease. Better characterization of these exposures is needed to decrease disease burden. Objective: To identify exposures in the residential setting that associate with ALS risk, survival, and onset segment. Methods: ALS and control participants recruited from University of Michigan completed a survey that ascertained exposure risks in the residential setting. ALS risk was assessed using logistic regression models followed by latent profile analysis to consider exposure profiles. A case-only analysis considered the contribution of the residential exposure variables via a Cox proportional hazards model for survival outcomes and multinomial logistic regression for onset segment, a polytomous outcome. Results: This study included 367 ALS and 255 control participants. Twelve residential variables were associated with ALS risk after correcting for multiple comparison testing, with storage in an attached garage of chemical products including gasoline or kerosene (odds ratio (OR) = 1.14, padjusted < 0.001), gasoline-powered equipment (OR = 1.16, padjusted < 0.001), and lawn care products (OR = 1.15, padjusted < 0.001) representing the top three risk factors sorted by padjusted. Latent profile analysis indicated that storage of these chemical products in both attached and detached garages increased ALS risk. Although residential variables were not associated with poorer ALS survival following multiple testing corrections, storing pesticides, lawn care products, and woodworking supplies in the home were associated with shorter ALS survival using nominal p values. No exposures were associated with ALS onset segment. Conclusion: Residential exposures may be important modifiable components of the ALS susceptibility and prognosis exposome.

PMID:38557405 | DOI:10.1080/21678421.2024.2336110